Holy Week Reflection & News Update…

Holy Week Reflection & News Update…

Comment: 

During Holy Week the blog is usually closed to comments.  This year, due to the unusual circumstances in which we find ourselves, we’ve decided to leave the blog open, while encouraging everyone to spend less time blogging – the Catholic Truth team plan to do just that, in order to focus as fully as possible on the events of this Holy Week through spiritual reading, reflection and prayer.   The various topic threads will remain open, but we won’t be posting any new topic threads.  Instead, everyone is free to post any news updates here, if the topic is not already listed.  So, whether it is a news update on the Coronavirus crisis or a specifically Church-related matter, this thread should serve the purpose. 

We would ask bloggers to resist the temptation to continue any conversation which looks like ending in an unpleasant argument – this week should be a peaceful week, where we find time to think seriously about what our Saviour suffered in order to afford us the possibility of saving our souls from eternal misery in Hell.  Any outbreak of animosity will force the administrator to take the necessary steps to restore peace.  Hopefully, we will all be able to benefit from the religious and spiritual content posted, and any news updates will be understood to be for information and reasonable commentary only.  Thank you everyone for your co-operation in this regard.   

The first purpose of this thread, of course, is to allow us to reflect on the Passion and Death of Our Lord.  Bloggers may post their own favourite reflections, poems, prayers and hymns to share, and since we are unable to attend the usual Church services, we may take advantage of the temporary provision of Live-Stream services here  (UK) and/or here (USA)   

We wish everyone a very peaceful and spiritually fruitful Holy Week.  

Comments (194)

  • editor

    This, Palm Sunday, (in case some of our non-Catholic readers do not know) is when we have the whole Gospel of the Passion of Our Lord read/chanted by the priest. I watched the Mass from Woking on the SSPX UK YouTube channel this morning, and followed the Gospel in English in my missal. This remark of Our Lord embedded itself in my mind, more than ever before: when one of his disciples (possibly the impetuous Peter) struck the servant of the High Priest with his sword,cutting off his ear, Our Lord rebuked him, saying: “Thinkest thou that I cannot ask My Father, and He will give me presently more than twelve legions of Angels?”

    Brought home to me afresh that all of us ought to be more convinced of the power of prayer to bring an end to our current predicament, especially public prayer – a public statement to an unbelieving world that we know that God can bring an end to this suffering.

    We have been considering the possibility of obtaining permission to organise a public rosary (I can’t believe I just wrote that!) so perhaps all of our bloggers and readers will join us in prayer for guidance on this – and pray to the Guardian Angels of all those in authority with whom we may have to “dialogue” to achieve our aim. I’ve heard of one young family who processed round their garden this morning, for Palm Sunday, using the prayers of the Blessing of the Palms from the missal, and finished with a Rosary at the statue of Our Lady in their garden. At one point, the sun shone brilliantly on the statue, noticeable enough to bring them some real consolation.

    Then, this morning, my inbox brought me an email from a reader which included the following video plea from a young man, married with a family, who lives in the Diocese of Motherwell – he pleads with the Bishops of Scotland to re-open our churches. It makes very interesting listening.

    This is not a YouTube video, unfortunately, so I hope the link opens…

    https://www.icloud.com/attachment/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fcvws.icloud-content.com%2FB%2FAY7tbUswVZbp_bEA8SaguO8IfWlDAXBARMmyLR8DdK3-iNn9v-mrF9i6%2F%24%7Bf%7D%3Fo%3DAjQ5BH7wuD8grXJvEuHfAIR71Q_kEKQMdqM0hwPRaQtB%26v%3D1%26x%3D3%26a%3DCAogcINvI32rYxkwbw0o0YBKpEEfVjljMZWq2ZiLzHgD3MESJxDmgcqdlC4Y5pHF8Z0uIgEAKggByAD_HehkcFIECH1pQ1oEqxfYug%26e%3D1588570704%26k%3D%24%7Buk%7D%26fl%3D%26r%3DE2B98B3F-4942-4FDF-B3D2-B4482D42C33D-1%26ckc%3Dcom.apple.largeattachment%26ckz%3DCF1A4F32-CF30-43C0-8CCF-2A79A12155A1%26p%3D46%26s%3D_6FiHic1RbrmM840x5VDCEfoNfo&uk=caZZzVcBOmQ_2MpcD2pt_g&f=VIDEO-2020-04-03-19-35-09.mp4&sz=67277440

    PS – it does! Enjoy!

    April 5, 2020 at 1:55 pm
    • Lily

      Editor,

      I really liked that young man’s talk. It came straight from the heart.

      There’s just one reservation – I wouldn’t like to have the bishops allow Holy Communion outside of Mass. That’s an exception for people who are really ill and can’t get to Mass, so the priest comes with Holy Communion to the homes of the sick, but I can’t see us going to a church and standing in a line to receive Holy Communion separate from the Mass. That doesn’t seem right. But I praise that young man for making that video – he has done well to let it be known in public that Catholics are not happy about having the sacraments kept from us. I hope the bishops listen to him.

      I will be listening to the video hymn God of Mercy all through Holy Week – I love it and it helps me to reflect on the price which Jesus paid for our salvation.

      April 5, 2020 at 4:03 pm
      • catholicconvert1

        Lily,

        I believe that I have read that during Archbishop Lefebvre’s childhood in Tourcoing, the priests used to distribute Holy Communion outside Mass every 15 minutes to the industrial workers who did not have time to attend daily Mass.

        April 5, 2020 at 7:46 pm
      • Michaela

        Catholic Convert 1,

        I am very surprised that priests have ever done that, given Holy Communion to workers “who did not have time to attend daily Mass.” There’s no obligation to attend a daily Mass, so that is quite odd.

        I remember this happened in a parish I used to live in; there was a woman who could not attend the early Mass (8 am) because of her job, and she asked if the priest would give her Communion before Mass. He agreed but after a while, he told her this was not right and he couldn’t do this any more. She wasn’t at all pleased.

        IMHO, it is a dangerous thing to do because it makes people think that it is receiving Holy Communion that is the most important thing, but it’s not. It’s the offering of the Sacrifice of Calvary. We are obliged to attend Mass on Sundays and holy days but only obliged to receive Holy Communion once a year “at Easter or thereabouts” as our catechism taught! Obviously, we are encouraged to receive more often but it doesn’t sit right with me that any priest would distribute Holy Communion in the way you describe. They should have been told to make a spiritual Communion.

        April 5, 2020 at 10:33 pm
      • Petrus

        Michaela,

        I couldn’t agree more. Think about it – if people turn up just for Holy Communion you can see why “Communion Services” with Extraordinary Ministers sprung up.

        April 6, 2020 at 11:08 am
      • Vianney

        Catholicconvert,

        It used to be the custom in Edinburgh Cathedral for Communion to be distributed just before the lunchtime Mass. This was for workers who were there in their lunch hour and couldn’t wait for the entire Mass.

        April 6, 2020 at 12:08 am
    • RCAVictor

      Editor,

      What about your PP leading a small Eucharistic Procession? Would that require a permit/permission?

      April 5, 2020 at 5:17 pm
      • editor

        RCA Victor,

        I think permission would be required from the police – I’m just assuming that, given that we are all supposed to be indoors most of the time, and we are not supposed to gather in groups of more than two at a time, and that is within our own household.

        There was a report the other day that the LGBT+ lobby in Brighton are insisting on holding their annual “Pride” march in summer, whatever the rules, so we must watch to see (a) if they ask permission and (b) if they receive it.

        April 5, 2020 at 8:08 pm
    • Michaela

      Hurrah! for that young man, calling the bishops to book. Well done, him! I hope they see the video and that he gets a reply.

      April 5, 2020 at 10:35 pm
    • gabriel syme

      Editor,

      I thought the man’s video was good and he was spot on when he suggested the Scottish (and wider) Church was behaving like an organisation / corporation, given the almost indecent haste to shut down and lock the doors.

      I did think he was brave – filming himself out of doors in the current environment, I would not be surprised to learn he was currently languishing in a cell! 😛

      April 6, 2020 at 10:08 pm
    • Margaret USA

      Dear Madame Editor,

      Our retired Archbishop Stephen Sulyk, 95, had
      COVID-19 symptoms and passed away 6 April.
      He was a priest for almost 70 years and a bishop for almost 40 years. He consecrated our parish church 20+ years ago.

      Please ask the entire CT family to pray for the repose of his soul. Please pray for me too – Mom passed away in November, my Aunt Margaret died last month and now Archbishop Sulyk.

      Eternal memory!

      Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May their souls and all the souls of the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.

      Yours in Christ the King,

      Margaret 🇺🇸

      April 7, 2020 at 1:50 am
    • Margaret USA

      Dear Madame Editor,

      The Remnant posted this earlier:

      https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/4844-archbishop-vigano-asks-bishops-and-priests-to-recite-an-exorcism-on-holy-saturday

      Please ask your SSPX chaplains and other traditional priests in Scotland to join Archbishop Vigano in prayer on Holy Saturday.

      This is just as necessary as the SSPX Day of Reparation last 6 December.

      Yours in Christ the King,

      Margaret 🇺🇸

      April 9, 2020 at 4:37 pm
      • Athanasius

        Margaret USA

        I’ll forward your request to the District Superior of the SSPX in England. The more clergy who join in this vital exorcism the better.

        April 9, 2020 at 11:58 pm
      • editor

        Thank you Margaret – I’m afraid I’m only seeing your request now but Athanasius is on the case, so I don’t feel so guilty!

        April 10, 2020 at 10:30 am
  • Josephine

    I love the hymn in the intro, “God of Mercy” – it’s really beautiful, and so appropriate for Holy Week.

    I planned to do more spiritual reading this Holy Week, so now I’m motivated to begin by reading through today’s Gospel slowly, to take everything in more. Jesus’s comment about his father sending legions of angels if he only asked him, hadn’t really particularly struck me before I read the intro to this thread, probably because of the lockdown.

    This link is to an article by Peter Hitchens on the lockdown – he has been very opposed to it from the start, but now other voices are adding theirs to his, and I found this article very thought provoking.
    I’m offering it in the spirit of the thread intro – not to cause argument, just for thought, and maybe we could all pray that what he thinks doesn’t happen as a result of us all being obedient to the government restrictions:
    https://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2020/04/peter-hitchens-the-deep-velvet-quiet-of-our-cities-is-as-terrifying-as-a-fire-bell-in-the-night.html#comments

    April 5, 2020 at 2:25 pm
    • Nicky

      Josephine,

      That’s interesting about today’s Gospel because I’ve decided to try to read through the Gospels during Holy Week. I should have been doing this through Lent but I wasn’t consistent, so I’m on a roll to get some solid spiritual reading done this week. Maybe I’ll get some deeper thoughts on the Coronavirus crisis than I’ve had so far!

      The Hitchens article is very interesting, and I found lots of the comments underneath the article, also interesting. I think it’s good that we have independent thinkers like Peter Hitchens speaking out. He is unfazed by opposition, I remember him once speaking on a TV show discussing some moral issue and he was last to speak. All he said was that it was the Ten Commandments not the Ten Suggestions! LOL! That took the wind out of everyone’s sails!

      April 5, 2020 at 3:55 pm
  • Fidelis

    The Pope sends a message to all the faithful for Holy Week

    April 5, 2020 at 3:32 pm
    • Athanasius

      Fidelis

      I had to laugh at the words “This is what we need today: the creativity of love”. Why do they always have to come away with these cryptic messages instead of just speaking plainly and giving examples.

      The Creator’s Church has been shut down to the faithful. There can be no creativity of love when the very sources of love, the Holy Mass and the Sacrament of Holy Communion are taken away when they are most needed.

      What is needed today is that the Pope and the Catholic hierarchy submit to Our Lady’s Fatima request to Consecrate Russia to her Immaculate Heart, and then open the chapels so that souls can access the source of grace and peace once more. Anything less is just empty rhetoric.

      April 9, 2020 at 8:48 pm
      • RCAVictor

        Athanasius,

        The “creativity of love” message from our pop psychologist Pope reminded me of this image from the old Beatles movie, Yellow Submarine:

        https://i.pinimg.com/736x/16/d9/15/16d9156b9ed1c19bad9ac43136f8b954.jpg

        Ah yes, the Beatles – those disciples of the Satanist Aleister Crowley….

        April 10, 2020 at 3:52 pm
      • Athanasius

        RCA Victor

        I never liked the Beatles, hated their music and their arrogance. You’re right about the association with Aleister Crowley, which explains why Lennon once blasphemously claimed that the Beatles were more popular than God, or words to that effect. Mr. Lennon, the man of “free love” in shop windows, etc. Where is he now, I wonder?

        I agree that these ambiguous statements of the Pope are very much in the mould of the that Beatles image, all psychedelic and illusory. It’s not divine love being referred to, I fear.

        April 10, 2020 at 4:13 pm
      • RCAVictor

        Athanasius,

        Lennon allegedly sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for the success of his band – if true, there can be little doubt of where he is now…

        I would post an image of the Sgt. Pepper album cover to prove their interest in Crowley (= Sgt. Pepper), but I don’t want to stain the blog with an image of such evil. But I’m sorry to say that, having had no Catholic foundation in my youth, and no information about the true seductive nature of that music, I fell right into “Beatlemania” when I went to university. And along with most baby-boomers, I was utterly dejected when the band broke up.

        The subject of the Satanic roots of rock and roll music is more than sobering.

        April 10, 2020 at 4:40 pm
      • Athanasius

        RCA Victor

        You can hardly be blamed for music taken at face vaule by most youngsters. It’s only when we listen now to the lyrics that we realise how evil they are.

        Take Lennon’s “Imagine”, for example, the lyrics going something like “Imagine there’s no heaven, no hell below us. above us only sky” There’s the humanist denial of the supernatural. So many people will sing along with the catchy music not realising what their actually approving of. That’s how the devil works.

        April 10, 2020 at 8:05 pm
  • Fidelis

    I also love the God of Mercy and Compassion hymn – it’s always been one of my favourites.

    I also love O Come and Mourn with me Awhile, but I don’t think it’s on YouTube. These hymns do raise our minds and hearts to God, as all prayer should do.

    This is a very strange Holy Week without church services – it’s ok to have them on the internet but it’s not at all the same as being there in person.

    April 5, 2020 at 3:42 pm
  • Josephine

    I’m not trying to be controversial, I just came across this video of Nigel Farage on the subject of the lockdown and I thought I’d post it for bloggers’ interest – not to start an argument, LOL! It just gives us food for thought, IMHO.

    April 5, 2020 at 4:08 pm
    • Laura

      Josephine,

      Nigel is expressing the very same concerns I’ve been feeling. I was taken aback at the way the Health Secretary told an interviewer on TV that he would consider more measures if people didn’t stop sunbathing and other breaking of the rules. I find it all a bit concerning.

      April 5, 2020 at 7:36 pm
  • Petrus

    I watched the Palm Sunday Mass from our SSPX church in Edinburgh which was at 11am.

    April 5, 2020 at 4:14 pm
    • Vianney

      Petrus,

      Unfortunately, there was a problem with the sound, but hopefully that will be sorted out.

      April 5, 2020 at 11:48 pm
      • Petrus

        Vianney,

        I didn’t find it too bad at all. I could hear the priest perfectly. There was a little bit of interference, but nothing major.

        April 6, 2020 at 7:29 am
      • Vianney

        I think it was because he was having to use a lap top as cameras can’t e had for love nor money because everyone is live streaming. LOL.

        April 6, 2020 at 11:39 am
      • Petrus

        He did really well. I hope you gets good viewing numbers.

        April 6, 2020 at 4:59 pm
  • Fidelis

    I thought I would try again to find O Come and Mourn, and I found it on YouTube but a very different tune from the one I knew growing up. I think it’s beautiful, though, so I am sharing it now.

    April 5, 2020 at 5:56 pm
    • RCAVictor

      Fidelis,

      That’s the tune I’m familiar with, although I’ve only sung a harmonized version. Very haunting!

      April 5, 2020 at 6:07 pm
    • editor

      Fidelis,

      That’s LOVELY! The tune I knew in my youth was very different, but that one is really beautiful. I’ll be listening to it again, throughout the week.

      April 5, 2020 at 8:15 pm
      • Vianney

        Editor,

        This is the tune we are used to.

        https://youtu.be/3mino-eAwyM

        April 6, 2020 at 12:25 am
      • editor

        Vianney,

        Thank you. Love it. Pity there’s no-one singing it, but I’ll save that video for future use and add the lyrics below.

        April 6, 2020 at 10:51 am
      • Petrus

        I am sure this was sung in the Glasgow chapel not that long ago. I must practise this for next Lent….if we are allowed out by then!

        April 6, 2020 at 11:01 am
      • Athanasius

        Vianney

        Yes, that’s the tune I recognise. Beautiful hymn.

        April 6, 2020 at 1:30 pm
      • Lily

        Me, too, I grew up hearing that hymn, it’s beautiful.

        April 6, 2020 at 1:38 pm
  • Theresa Rose

    Like Fidelis, I too remember a different to tune to the hymn O Come and Mourn, but nevertheless it is a beautiful Lenten hymn. I was able to watch the Mass from Saint Michael’s School on the SSX UK you tube channel. And this evening returned to this channel for Benediction and the Rosary.

    April 5, 2020 at 6:57 pm
  • Laura

    I also haven’t heard that tune before for O Come & Mourn, but I love it. RCA Victor is right to say “haunting”- it’s really beautiful.

    April 5, 2020 at 7:33 pm
  • editor

    I watched the live-streamed Palm Sunday Mass from the link to the US, given in the introduction – Our Lady of Sorrows’ Chapel which began at 17.55pm (UK time) – once again absolutely beautiful, flawless, so dignified. Not that the technical side of things was flawless this time, there was a problem with the video at one point early on, but it was soon fixed.

    It is really helpful to have the prayers and readings in English on the left hand side, and the beautiful Spiritual Communion and Thanksgiving after Communion prayers, across the screen during Communion, as well. It’s been well thought through and beautifully executed. Top marks!

    Reading the Gospel again, the entire account of Our Lord’s Passion, His words to his hitherto friends, struck me forcibly. I feel a sermon coming on 😀 It should remind us not to be surprised, albeit disappointed, when people we have thought of as friends, suddenly turn against us, for no apparent reason. That hit home, when Our Lord said to “the multitudes” who had followed him and stood now against him: “You are come out, as it were to a robber, with swords and clubs to apprehend me. I sat daily with you teaching in the temple and you laid not hands on me.” Later, Pilate was to understand within himself that it was envy which motivated those who had turned against him.

    So, between the live-streamed Palm Sunday Mass from Woking (celebrated by Fr Clifton, by the way, who has done “time” in Scotland!) and the American Mass, I’ve not had too much time to spare, but that time has been profitably spent in catching up on my reading.

    One book which I’ve had for ages but hardly touched, is Fatima and The Great Conspiracy by Deirdre Manifold RIP. Deirdre, whom I’ve never met, sent me a signed copy with a lovely letter some years ago, so it is to my personal shame that I’m only now getting round to reading it properly.

    It is first class, especially for these times. She links what happened at Fatima with other historical events and with what – at time of her writing, in the 1980s – was going on in politics and banking. It’s truly riveting. I recommend it highly – although I’m only half-way through, but everything so far has been thoroughly documented, and I don’t see that changing. If it does, I’ll report back and own yet another mistake. I really must go on a course to update my infallibility certificate 😀

    Thanks for all the videos and links – I’ll get round to watching / reading everything asap.

    April 5, 2020 at 8:37 pm
    • Vianney

      Editor,

      I watched the Mass from the school this morning and, guess what? the purple had been ironed. Someone down there must read Catholic Truth.

      April 6, 2020 at 12:03 am
      • editor

        Vianney,

        I think it’s a safe bet that a lot of people read Catholic Truth who don’t admit it. It’s the religious equivalent, to some, akin to the top shelf reading in some newsagents 😀

        As one priest told me some years ago, speaking of the bishops: “They all read it – they hate it, but they read it!”

        Do you hear me complaining? They can hate it all they like; as long as they’re reading it, my work is done 😀

        April 6, 2020 at 10:48 am
    • Athanasius

      Editor

      I watched the Mass from Our Lady of Sorrows in the U.S. as well, first time in years I’ve participated (albeit from a distance) in a Pontifical High Mass, with priests as deacon and subdeacon. Sadly, I experienced the same video interruption which was really annoying, if short lived. Beautiful choir and equally beautiful chapel, though I would like to see some holy frescos being painted on those white walls to glorify the interior even more. The Stations of the Cross look magnificent from the side glances I was able to get, very conducive to devotion.

      Speaking of which, I think the Stations of the Cross is a great devotion for Holy Week in particular, a great preparation for what is about to unfold and really conducive to sorrow and penance for sins. My other favourite is the book “The Way of Divine Love”, a collection of allocutions given by Our Lord to Sister Joesfa Menendez. I suspect few will have a copy of this book but everyone, I’m sure, will have a little booklet of the Stations.

      Looks like we’ll all have plenty of time to read more this week given that the government is all set to tighten further our house arrest. Oops! I meant “self isolation”!

      April 6, 2020 at 12:36 am
      • editor

        Athanasius,

        I agree about the white walls – I was thinking, waiting for the Mass to begin (after that I was lost in mystical contemplation, as usual 😀 ) that perhaps it was so bare either side of the altar because it is Lent/Holy Week, and that maybe they have lots of flowers there normally. Certainly, something on the walls would be a huge improvement.

        I sincerely hope the Government doesn’t tighten the restrictions – I’m just back from a trip to the supermarket and witnessed a man ticking off a woman who was walking in the “wrong” direction in the aisle (they’ve marked them with arrows (i.e. up this aisle and down the next). She humbly embarked on an explanation so I’m afraid I broke all of my Lenten and Holy Week resolve to try to be more charitable and, instead, contributed the following: Welcome to the new normal – policemen everywhere!” Then ran!

        We really should pray hard for an end to this because while the TV news is full of examples of people being kind etc. there is, without doubt, a certain officiousness around as well. Human nature I suppose. We can’t complain. We’ve all got it!

        April 6, 2020 at 10:44 am
      • Athanasius

        Editor

        Yes, there are a lot of jobworthies out there right now, enjoying that wee bit of power they think the government’s Coronavirus rules gives them. Oh well, if it fills their otherwise empty lives, making them feel important for a wee while, who are we to take their little pleasure from them?

        April 6, 2020 at 2:06 pm
  • RCAVictor

    I was just listening to a Passiontide retreat which focused, interestingly enough, on Our Lord drawing near to the two disciples on the road to Emmaus, and “,,, beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded to them in all the scriptures, the things that were concerning him.”

    It occurred to me that this is precisely what the Church, His Mystical Body, taking up the example of her Spouse and Head, does for Catholics: the Magisterium expounds to us “in all the scriptures, the things that were concerning him” – the holy Fathers, Doctors and theologians not leaving us, in other words, to grope for our own interpretations, as, in fact, those two disciples seem to be groping for the meaning of what had just transpired, until Our Lord explained all to them.

    It never ceases to amaze me how perfectly everything fits together in the Church. No human design, this.

    April 6, 2020 at 2:12 am
    • Athanasius

      RCA Victor

      A very profound observation, and so true. It follows also that the various Protestant Sects having once departed from the Mystical Body, the Church, are groping for interpretations, which explains why there are around 250 of them all teaching different things.

      April 6, 2020 at 3:53 am
  • Theresa Rose

    Father Robert Brucciani, the District Superior of Britain and Ireland was interviewed in November 2019 by Brian O Caithniadh. Father talks of how he became a priest of the Society, what is happening in society in general and the Catholic Church in general and how people are losing the faith.

    April 6, 2020 at 8:39 am
    • Petrus

      Theresa Rose

      I think I’ve seen that interview. Well worth a watch.

      April 6, 2020 at 10:17 am
  • Petrus

    I think bloggers might appreciate this link to free Catholic books. This really is a reading list for life.

    http://www.traditionalcatholic.co/free-catholicbooks/

    I’m hoping to start “The Saviour and His Love for Us”.

    April 6, 2020 at 1:08 pm
    • Lily

      Thanks for that – it will save me hunting through back copies of the newsletter. I know it was published in the newsletter and on the blog but I’ve not been able to find it, so I can stop my search now, LOL!

      April 6, 2020 at 1:36 pm
      • Petrus

        I don’t remember it being published in the newsletter. It was sent to me by a priest abroad.

        April 6, 2020 at 1:58 pm
      • editor

        Lily,

        It was in the newsletter on two separate occasions and I keep forgetting to link it on the website, so thanks for the reminder.

        April 6, 2020 at 3:57 pm
      • Petrus

        Editor,

        I’ve no recollection of seeing it in one newsletter, nevermind two! I think it was I who sent you the link after the priest sent it to me. No matter, as long as people benefit it doesn’t matter.

        April 6, 2020 at 4:31 pm
      • editor

        Petrus,

        If you sent it to me, I’ve forgotten that.

        In fact, my own memory of finding out about that website – which of course may be faulty – was on the Spiritual Reading thread we ran some time ago. If you scroll, you will see that the blogger John provided the link there – you showed no sign of recognising it, didn’t remark on it at all, so maybe it was later that you found out about it (or had your memory refreshed) and sent it to me, although I have no recollection whatsoever of receiving the link from you. However, my memory is not a prize-winner, so that means nothing 😀
        https://catholictruthblog.com/2019/03/18/without-good-books-and-spiritual-reading-it-will-be-morally-impossible-to-save-our-souls-st-alphonsus-liguori/

        I’m really not too bothered about who got it to me first – the main thing is to spread it far and wide. I did publish it in the newsletter on two different occasions but, lockdown or no lockdown, I’ve no time to search for it – in any case, no need. It’s not that important. The key thing is, as I say, to publish it far and wide.

        So, if you sent it to me – many thanks. And thanks again to John for posting it on the blog, back in the day.

        April 6, 2020 at 7:12 pm
      • Petrus

        Editor,

        I think that thread was probably before I got it, so that makes sense.

        My apologies – I didn’t, in fact, send it to you. It was a relation of yours I sent it to.

        April 6, 2020 at 7:17 pm
  • Petrus

    I hope the Scots amongst us will watch the live feeds from Scotland and support our Prior who has worked very hard getting it set up.

    April 6, 2020 at 4:45 pm
    • gabriel syme

      Petrus,

      Yes I echo that, the efforts made by the clergy in Scotland deserve to be rewarded with support.

      April 6, 2020 at 9:36 pm
      • Petrus

        Gabriel,

        Yes, couldn’t agree more. I was a bit disappointed that more bloggers didn’t seem to watch our own priest despite his efforts.

        April 6, 2020 at 9:45 pm
      • gabriel syme

        Petrus,

        It could be that some people did not know about the online Scottish mass – it certainly took me by surprise, given there was already an SSPX service set up in the UK.

        I checked this evening and SSPX Scotland is now almost at the 1,000 subscribers mark.

        Having said that, it was well below this level on Sunday and yet the stream went ahead. Perhaps You-Tube have relaxed their rules due to the current social situation?

        The mass went well, especially for a “first attempt”, although there were some sound gremlins. There were almost 30-viewers, including from various Scottish Islands and even Poland.

        I am sure the stream quality will only improve – having said that, let us hope we can physically return to the pews in short order!

        April 6, 2020 at 10:02 pm
      • Petrus

        Gabriel,

        Yes, it could be that people didn’t know, although the pink was posted here on Friday or Sunday.

        April 6, 2020 at 10:05 pm
      • editor

        Gabriel Syme,

        I didn’t advertise the Scotland channel for a number of reasons, the main one being that we do not need it. And no priest asked me to do so. In any case, we have a UK channel and that should suffice.

        Also, someone sent me a link to a short message from the Prior explaining that he would be setting up the channel. In this message, Father spoke in Gaelic. I’ve personally never met anyone who speaks Gaelic, so that puzzles me.

        Additionally, the SSPX symbol has been set against a background of the Scottish flag. I am concerned that the SSPX in Scotland may be seen to be mixing nationalism and politics with the Faith, and that does not appeal to me at all. The SNP, as we know, is the very antithesis of all things Catholic. It was shocking enough when Peter Kearney, Spokesman for the Scottish Bishops Conference, “came out” as an SNP supporter, and it is equally disappointing to see the SSPX in Scotland appearing to be making a statement in support of narrow Scottish nationalism and thus politics.

        I was also concerned to hear the Prior say in that statement that he plans to keep this livestream “service” going, for the people who can’t get to the Mass. Sounds fine, but the traditional means of catering for those who can’t get to Mass through age/long-term illness is to take Holy Communion to them, and to hear their confessions at home. Nothing, but nothing, can possibly replace that.

        I said at the outset of this lockdown/livestream Masses that a danger in these Masses is that the impression is given that we can hear Mass online, no need to attend church. So, in general, while availing myself of the online provision when possible, I think there is no need to multiply and make “national channels” as if somehow we owe a loyalty to our country in this regard. We don’t.

        Finally, priests need to beware of allowing idleness to rule the day during this lockdown. Frankly, there’s not a lot of effort in being filmed offering the Mass. And as one of our readers asked me when it became clear that our priests were not keeping the church opened during this time of lockdown: “What is going to happen when things get worse?” A very good question. We have the example of the priests during the Reformation period when the penalty to pay for not keeping to the rules was to have their heads cut off, not simply a telling off from the police. Nigel Farage openly boasts of breaking the one walk a day rule – he takes two walks and so far as I know, hasn’t even had a metaphorical slap on the wrist.

        We want something more from our priests as we begin to see the Fatima prophecies unfold. If the best on offer is a televised Mass, we can put up with that but we don’t want priests making a Hollywood career out of it 😀

        I will continue to use the UK channel and the beautiful USA channel.

        April 7, 2020 at 10:41 am
      • Petrus

        Editor,

        Scotland always has been a separate entity in ecclesiastical terms.
        Editor: that does not apply to the SSPX. The SSPX UK is one District, comprising Ireland and Great Britain, without autonomous regions.

        April 7, 2020 at 2:49 pm
      • Vianney

        Editor,

        The SSPX symbol set against the saltire has nothing to do with nationalism. The Great Britain site has the symbol against the Union flag while the Irish site has it set against the tricolour. Other countries have done the same thing, such as New Zealand, where the symbol sits in the middle of the stars.

        Editor: flags are always to do with nationalism! I had to search for quite a while before I found the District of Ireland logo with the tricolour (not very pronounced – the green, white and gold has become green, white and a faded orange 😀 ) but I can’t find any national flags against the Society symbol on either the GB site or the New Zealand site. Whatever, I don’t like it. Maybe in Ireland it isn’t significant (!) but in Scotland the saltire is definitely associated with the current drive for independence and I found it immediately off-putting. Not because I’m opposed to independence per se, but because I think it is highly inappropriate to connect the Society livestream Masses with the national Scottish flag. Ditto the other two countries. Why would they want to do that? What’s the purpose? Don’t they know that national flags – certainly in the UK – are often the source of division? Here in Glasgow, visit Celtic Park or Ibrox (Rangers) any weekend to see the problems caused by fans waving Irish flags on the one hand and Union Jacks on the other – well, not literally in the hands of individuals, but you’ll get my drift. Much more sensible to share the same religious symbol across the Society districts. I understand that you are a keen Scottish nationalist, and I mean no personal offence, but I have to say that I do find this news about the SSPX symbol being adapted to include pictures of national flags extremely disappointing.

        PS – I don’t know why your posts are going into my admin file. WordPress is doing this far too much – so far, every one of our new blogger’s (Claire) comments have had to be released for publication. I apologise for this – no idea why. I mean, you’re not that badly behaved 😀

        April 10, 2020 at 8:31 pm
      • Athanasius

        Petrus
        I had noted your advertising of Fr. Wall’s Scottish livestream Mass but paid little attention to it as we have already subscribed to Fr. Brucciani’s SSPX Mass channel on Youtube, which supplies for the whole of the UK District.

        Besides that, you may or may not be aware that Fr. Wall and I disagree profoundly on his understanding of how Low Mass should be celebrated. It is Father’s contention that low Mass should be celebrated entirely in silent voice by the priest, but the Church’s rubrics state that only the prayers of the Canon should be said silently, hence the alternative name for the Low Mass “Missa Lecta” or spoken Mass. The congregation can’t follow the prayers of the Mass if they can’t hear what the priest is saying.

        The upshot of it all is that when Fr. Wall celebrates a livestreamed low Mass it’s going to transmit like a silent movie. It’s a unique take Father has on the low Mass, not shared by any other priest I have known.

        I am also slightly perturbed by the Saltire/Gaelic element in the livestreams. The Church is universal, not regional, so I think anything of a nationalist nature should be left out lest viewers mistakenly think the SSPX is pro-SNP, which would be a travesty. I’m sure that was not the intention but it doesn’t sit well given that the Saltire these days has become synonymous with Scottish Nationalism.

        To be honest, I don’t follow the Masses in the UK anyway, I follow the Mass in Florida. The time suits me better and the Chapel and singing are so uplifting. That’s the beauty of the ancient Latin Mass and the universality of the Church, Mass in every country is like being at home.

        April 7, 2020 at 1:27 pm
      • Petrus

        Athanasius,

        I must check out the Florida Mass.

        April 7, 2020 at 2:04 pm
      • Athanasius

        Petrus

        It’s streamed live around 6pm our time, very edifying.

        April 7, 2020 at 3:06 pm
      • Laura

        Athanasius,

        I agree about the UK Mass – the SSPX District is for Ireland and Great Britain as Fr Brucciani points out in the video above, so it seems a shame to make divisions where none are necessary.

        I was glad to have the choice of St Michael’s or Woking. I watched the Woking Mass. It was nice to see Fr Clifton again.

        April 7, 2020 at 7:20 pm
      • Athanasius

        Laura

        Yes, I have a lot of time for Fr. Clifton, a priest with great humility.

        As regards the UK Mass, I agree that it’s best kept as a District affair rather than regional, it’s more in keeping with unity, I think.

        April 7, 2020 at 8:55 pm
      • Theresa Rose

        Laura,

        I agree with you about the UK Mass. And as you say the SSPX District is Great Britain and Ireland and we have access to streamlined Masses whether in the USA or here in the UK.

        If, on January 1st 2020 – someone told me that from Palm Sunday on for goodness knows how long, that Catholic Churches would be closed and our alternative would left to watching streamlined Masses – I would not have believed them. This happening due to the Corona virus, which I hear is making people very ill indeed.

        I find this a heavy cross to bear in not being physically present at Mass, deprived of the Sacrament of Penance, receiving Communion. Although I must make a Spiritual Communion. I also think of, and, pray for those poor souls who may well die in hospital without as much as a priest present to hear their last Confession and/or receive the Sacrament of Extreme Unction. That may well be the difference between going to Heaven or Hell.

        I am grateful to be able to see streamlined Mass at St Michael’s school, but it is not the same, and I worry how long this situation will last. A big Chastisement seems to be happening. No wonder we need to pray the Rosary.

        April 7, 2020 at 9:40 pm
      • RCAVictor

        Athanasius,

        I don’t have nearly as much experience with Low Masses as do you and probably most on the blog, but I have never heard a silent Low Mass.

        April 7, 2020 at 11:40 pm
      • Athanasius

        RCA Victor

        That’s the problem with a silent Low Mass, it can’t be heard. Strangest thing I’ve come across in my life as a Catholic and certainly not what the Church intends in the rubrics. Highly questionable.

        April 7, 2020 at 11:55 pm
  • RCAVictor

    FYI for those of you whose parishes are live-streaming Masses, etc. using the Zoom software platform: I am suspicious that Zoom is selling email addresses, since there has been a sudden and significant uptick in spam at the email address I use to log into Zoom.

    Anyone else notice this?

    April 6, 2020 at 5:10 pm
    • Athanasius

      RCA Victor

      I don’t use Zoom myself but I wonder if the issue you mention is just to do with the sudden and massive increase in livestreaming during our government-imposed house arrest.

      April 6, 2020 at 5:52 pm
  • editor

    Please pray for the Prime Minister, who has now been taken into intensive care.

    Our Lady of Lourdes, Health of the Sick, pray for him.

    April 6, 2020 at 8:47 pm
    • gabriel syme

      Poor Boris, I will say a pray for him and all the sick.

      I hope he recovers soon (not least as he is to become a father again – albeit in his usual inglorious fashion!)

      April 6, 2020 at 10:10 pm
    • Athanasius

      Editor

      I will certainly pray for the Prime Minister, that he fully recovers. I hope sincerely that he repents having apostatised from his Catholic Faith and turns back to Our Lord in this time of illness.

      April 6, 2020 at 10:52 pm
      • Petrus

        Athanasius,

        I was amazed when you posted that news a few weeks ago. I didn’t know that about Boris. It’s quite shocking. I know the dire consequences of apostatising – I hope Boris thinks again.

        April 6, 2020 at 10:57 pm
      • Athanasius

        Petrus

        Yes, Boris was born and baptised a Catholic but later swiched to Anglicanism. His late mother was the Catholic, I believe, but, for whatever reason, he switched to Anglicanism, doubtless because of the less rigorous demands on morality and the unspoken rule that forbids practicing Catholics from becoming Prime Minister. Sad really.

        April 6, 2020 at 11:07 pm
      • Petrus

        Athanasius,

        Yes, I think those two things were probably the driving factors.

        April 7, 2020 at 10:03 am
      • catholicconvert1

        Comment Removed – we are apolitical on this blog. Please do not come on to deliver a Party Political Broadcast for any Party – least of all in Holy Week.

        April 7, 2020 at 5:12 pm
      • catholicconvert1

        I believe Jesus had a few things to say about treating the poor. And you are NOT apolitical, people denounced me for voting Labour.
        Editor: Our Lord did indeed have something to say about treating the poor, but nothing whatsoever about Party Politics. He studiously avoided politics.
        You were “denounced” as you put it, for voting Labour because the Church prohibits us from voting for any system, any Party which supports abortion. The point was made (is made on the blog over and over) that as Catholics we must be pro-life.

        April 7, 2020 at 8:02 pm
      • catholicconvert1

        And yet people on here voted for parties, Tory and SNP, which are also pro-abortion.
        Ed: I have said over and over that I spoil my paper and so have others because no Party is pro-life.

        As I said, I’ll pray for the people who are suffering this Holy Week.

        April 7, 2020 at 8:31 pm
      • Athanasius

        CC

        I was writing out a response to your earlier comment and then had second thoughts because I, too, felt it was a bit political for Holy Week.

        Our Lord was far more concerned about poverty of the soul, which is immortal. Sure, we all have a duty to alleviate the sufferings of others in whatever way we can, but the corporal works of mercy are always secondary to the spiritual works of mercy. “Seek first the Kingdom of heaven”, said Our Lord, “and all things will be added unto you”.

        It’s a sad reality that in these modern times so many are more zealous for Socialism than the supernatural life.

        April 7, 2020 at 9:01 pm
  • gabriel syme

    One thing I have been thinking about recently is that this virus situation is showing us all (well, me anyway) about how we (I) can take the availability of mass and the sacraments for granted.

    It has only been two sundays and yet being at mass already seems so long ago now. How nice it will be to return to our familiar kneelers in our little Church.

    As the end of lent approaches, normally I am eagerly anticipating opening large, er, modest quantities of beer and crisps – yet this year I find myself longing to attend mass. (My thoughts have turned to beer once or twice, granted).

    It is particularly sad that this crisis has struck during Holy Week, but I suppose the timing cannot be helped.

    The situation has made me think of isolated communities – like in the Amazon region, which we heard so much about recently – who often have to go long periods without mass and the sacraments. How lucky we are (normally) by comparison.

    I also reflected on my past sins, (of which there is no shortage), and considered how easily I have fallen in to sin at times, how cheaply I have squandered God’s grace. In that regard, this period of time – with difficult (if any) access to confession – is almost like a lesson, in that we (I) am being shown that we canmust – be more careful with the condition of our souls.

    April 6, 2020 at 10:21 pm
    • Petrus

      A very profound comment, Gabriel.

      April 6, 2020 at 10:25 pm
    • editor

      Gabriel Syme,

      The situation has made me think of isolated communities…”

      Interesting. It’s made me think of the priest martyrs at the time of the Reformation – like our own John Ogilvie – who disguised themselves, organised secret Masses etc. rather than deny the faithful the grace of the Sacraments – our very own PPE – Personal Protective Equipment!

      April 6, 2020 at 11:19 pm
    • RCAVictor

      Gabriel Syme.

      There is a section in Fr. Tanqueray’s famous book The Spiritual Life in which he suggests that we perform a thorough examination of conscience on our use of our natural and supernatural gifts.

      The part of that section which helped me the most, just recently, was to ask ourselves how we have resisted God’s grace, which is a variation of your point about squandering God’s grace.

      I decided to use that question as the basis for a Lenten General Confession of sorts, and it was very revealing about certain disastrous patterns in my life.

      If anyone wants to try that, I can look up the page number in his book – just reply to this post.

      April 7, 2020 at 11:46 pm
      • editor

        RCA Victor,

        Are you able to quote from that page (I don’t have that book) or somehow copy the page to post here? I would love to read that page, so if all else fails, please do give the page number and I will see if it is available to read online.

        April 8, 2020 at 9:36 am
      • RCAVictor

        Editor,

        The section on self-knowledge starts on p. 221, but see “Practical Applications, ” starting with # 452, p. 223.

        The question about resistance to grace is #459, p. 225 – it is the last question of the self-examination.

        The book is on line here: https://archive.org/details/TanquereySpiritualLife/page/n2/mode/2up

        April 8, 2020 at 3:43 pm
  • Patrick Healy

    Thanks be to God.
    Cardinal Pell has won his appeal and is freed.
    He says he bears no animosity towards his torturers.
    Let us give thanks for prayers answered.

    April 7, 2020 at 7:17 am
    • gabriel syme

      Patrick,

      I just saw that news myself – how wonderful!

      This is some good cheer at this miserable time of social isolation etc, although if I was an Australian I would still be very concerned about having such a partisan, media-led judicial system.

      April 7, 2020 at 9:00 am
  • editor

    I came in to post the good news about Cardinal Pell but I’ve been beaten to it! Here’s the news wire from 7 hours ago…

    Australia’s highest court on Tuesday overturned former Vatican treasurer George Pell’s conviction for sexually assaulting two teenaged choirboys in the 1990s, allowing the 78-year-old cardinal to walk free from jail.

    In a unanimous ruling, the High Court found that the jury in Pell’s trial “ought to have entertained a doubt” as to Cardinal Pell’s guilt. The court’s seven judges ordered that the convictions be quashed and verdicts of acquittal be entered in their place, meaning Pell cannot be retried on the charges.

    The cardinal began serving a six-year sentence a year ago for the alleged assaults, which the plaintiff said took place place when Pell was archbishop of the city of Melbourne.

    Pell, who had denied the charges but did not take the stand at trial, was the highest ranked Catholic official worldwide to have been jailed for child sex offences.
    (REUTERS)

    Deo Gratias!

    April 7, 2020 at 9:42 am
    • Petrus

      Editor,

      I didn’t ever believe he was guilty. I remember watching the police interview and thinking he looked absolutely disgusted at the accusations.

      April 7, 2020 at 10:00 am
    • Athanasius

      Editor

      This is fantastic news. Justice has now truly been done. Deo Gratias!

      April 7, 2020 at 1:26 pm
  • Liam Jenkinson

    Please see the following items on life site news from April the 6th 2020.
    Item 1: Former royal Chaplin says UK Bishops spearheaded rotavirus church closures.
    Item2: Heroic pro life French doctor dies at 9, saved countless children.

    Please pray for both,
    Love and prayers
    Liam.

    April 7, 2020 at 10:48 am
    • editor

      Liam,

      Thank you for that interesting news – I’ve not had time to check Lifesitenews yet, but will do – that’s very interesting indeed.

      April 7, 2020 at 10:21 pm

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